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How to manipulate annotation text outline color in ArcEngine?

How to manipulate annotation text outline color in ArcEngine?


I can get the color of my annotation text like this:

IColor TextColor = lpLabelEngine.Symbol.Color;

How can I get / set the outline color?

Something like this, I want a black letter with a white outline, and the white outline is 3 pixels wide.


I started to reply with I don't think you can. except to use shadow or halo.
But did a search and walla! Here are a couple of pages that might help…
annotation masks
arcobjects calls


Adding new text to a map

Text serves a variety of purposes on a map, and ArcMap supports three main types: labels, annotation, and graphic text. ArcMap has several tools for creating new annotation and graphic text on a map. You can enter horizontal text, text that curves, and text that has a callout or leader line. To speed the task of adding descriptive text for features, you can use the Label tool to click a feature and automatically add text to annotate it. Once you have text on your map, you can use the tools on the Draw toolbar to change its position, appearance, and text string.
This topic focuses on creating and editing map document annotation and graphic text. While you can follow these steps to create and edit geodatabase annotation, there are powerful, easy-to-use editing tools in ArcMap designed specifically for working with geodatabase annotation. If you are working with geodatabase annotation, see An overview of editing annotation for instructions on creating and editing text stored in this format.
When using the tools on the Draw toolbar to add text, unless you specify otherwise, new text will be added to the <Default> annotation group of your data frame. You can change this by setting the Active Annotation Target.
Learn about the Active Annotation Target


Adding labels vs. adding annotation or graphic text

Labels are stored differently from annotation and graphic text. ArcMap labels are placed dynamically and are the easiest way to quickly add descriptive text for many features based on feature attributes. To turn on labels, see Displaying labels.
By contrast, ArcGIS annotation and graphic text are editable and easily support adding individual pieces of text that are not associated with any map features.
Learn more about working with annotation and labels
You can create annotation for a number of features at once by converting from labels.
Learn about converting labels to annotation

To add new map document annotation or graphic text to your map, use the New Text tools on the Draw toolbar in ArcMap. These tools let you create new text:

  • At a point (text will be horizontal)
  • Along a curved line
  • With a callout box behind the text to mask what's underneath it, and a leader line pointing from the text box to another location

  • By clicking a feature and automatically deriving the text string from a feature attribute
  • That automatically flows within a rectangle, circle, or irregular polygon shape


Storage options when adding text

ArcGIS gives you several storage options for text that you need to be aware of when you add new text to your map.
If you are adding text to your map that is associated either with features or geographic spaces on your map (for example, oceans or mountain ranges), you should add annotation. Within this category, you can add your text as map document annotation or geodatabase annotation.
You should store your text in the map document only if you want to use the text in one particular map and only if you have relatively few pieces of text to add (less than a few hundred). You can use annotation groups to further organize map document annotation. Unless you specify otherwise, new text added with the tools on the Draw toolbar is added as map document annotation in the <Default> annotation group.
Learn more about annotation groups
You should store your text in the geodatabase if you want to use the same text in several maps or if you have more than a few hundred pieces of text to add. To add text to an annotation feature class stored in a geodatabase, use the ArcMap editing tools.
To add text around your map that stays fixed on the map page whether or not the map scale or extent changes, you should use graphic text. This text is sometimes referred to as layout text because you can only create it in layout view in ArcMap.
Learn more about annotation storage options:
About annotation
Annotation in the geodatabase
A comparison of annotation groups vs. geodatabase annotation.


How to add new text to a map

  1. Click the New Text tool on the Draw toolbar.
  2. Click the map display where you want the text and type the text string.
    The text will be horizontal.

  1. Click the New Splined Text tool on the Draw toolbar.
  2. Click the map display where you want to add vertices along which the text should be splined, that is, curved.
  3. Double-click to end the line.
  4. Type the text string.

  1. Click the Callout button on the Draw toolbar.
  2. Click a start point for the leader line and drag and release the mouse button where you want the callout and text to be placed (in the image below, the start point is the yellow dot).

  1. Click one of the Paragraph Text tools on the Draw toolbar.
    Choose either New Polygon , New Rectangle , or New Circle .
  2. Drag to create the graphic shape using your mouse pointer, then double-click to complete the shape.


There's no Unity-specific jargon for this, because what you're describing is not the engine's job. That's part of your game, which means it's on you to implement this.

A rough outline of how this would work:

You'd make a data container script representing a "Hoverable" object.

You'd place an instance of this component on each object that you want to be able to get an annotation tooltip for, and configure its properties with the message/images or other data that you want to display.

You'd also ensure each such object has a collider to represent the shape and extents of its hoverable zone.

You'd make an annotation UI object that has the text fields or other visual interface you want for displaying the information about the hovered object.

You'd make a Selection / Hover Manager script responsible for keeping track of what the player is doing with their mouse. It would have a member variable to store the currently-hovered Hoverable component.

Each frame in Update, this script would convert the mouse position to a ray to fire into the scene. For each hit, you'd check to see if the hit collider has a Hoverable component attached. Then you have a few possibilities:

You find a Hoverable component, and it's the same as the currently-hovered Hoverable component. Do nothing and keep showing the current message.

You find no Hoverable component, and you didn't have a currently-hovered Hoverable component. Do nothing and keep showing no message.

You find no Hoverable component, and you previously had a currently-hovered Hoverable component. Now it's time to un-hover that component, hiding your annotation UI message and any hover highlight state.

You might want to give a small tolerance of time or distance before un-hovering, to make the selection a bit more forgiving and reduce flickering if the player holds their mouse right near the edge.

You find a Hoverable component different from your currently-hovered Hoverable component. Now it's time to show your annotation, populating it with the message/info from the Hoverable component you found and setting it as your currently-hovered Hoverable.

The selection / hover manager could manipulate the UI object(s) to display the message directly, or just publish events on hover state changes that other objects subscribe to, taking responsibility to update their own states when signaled.


Форматы данных ГИС. Оформление и качество

In this course, the second in the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Specialization, you will go in-depth with common data types (such as raster and vector data), structures, quality and storage during four week-long modules: Week 1: Learn about data models and formats, including a full understanding of vector data and raster concepts. You will also learn about the implications of a data’s scale and how to load layers from web services. Week 2: Create a vector data model by using vector attribute tables, writing query strings, defining queries, and adding and calculating fields. You'll also learn how to create new data through the process of digitizing and you'll use the built-in Editor tools in ArcGIS. Week 3: Learn about common data storage mechanisms within GIS, including geodatabases and shapefiles. Learn how to choose between them for your projects and how to optimize them for speed and size. You'll also work with rasters for the first time, using digital elevation models and creating slope and distance analysis products. Week 4: Explore datasets and assess them for quality and uncertainty. You will also learn how to bring your maps and data to the Internet and create web maps quickly with ArcGIS Online. Take GIS Data Formats, Design and Quality as a standalone course or as part of the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Specialization. You should have equivalent experience to completing the first course in this specialization, Fundamentals of GIS, before taking this course. By completing the second class in the Specialization you will gain the skills needed to succeed in the full program.

Получаемые навыки

Spatial Analysis, Analytics, Workflow, Data Management

Рецензии

Nick, you and your team did good job on making the course enjoyable, only problem I faced was having trouble downloading the tutorial 2 assignment data. Still it was a very good experience.

Good course, well structured to deliver the invaluable skills, ranging from data management to final output after processing. Good exposure to the toolbox, expecting more in the next course.

The first half of this module goes over uncertainty and data quality, including a lecture on topology, which affects data relationships in your vector feature classes. In Lesson 8, guest lecturer Megan Nguyen will talk all about using ArcGIS Online, including sharing our maps with our colleagues.

Преподаватели

Nick Santos

Текст видео

[MUSIC] Welcome back. In this video I will show you how to add map annotations to your map, in order to highlight certain features, as well as how to set a visibility range to make our layers scale dependent. To get started, we will need to add a map notes layer. Click on the Add tab to find the Add Map Notes option. Select a name you want for your layer. For this video, I will keep it as the default, Map Notes. You can also choose from a variety of templates. Each template has different set of icons. I'll show you an example. As you can see here, there are many different icons that you can select to highlight a certain disaster feature. But if we want to just make simple points, we are going to use the Map Notes template. And I'll show you how you can get all the special icons, despite which template you choose. Notice how I have two different sets of templates. I have a points template and a disasters. This is because I opened two different layers of map notes. You may only have one, depending on which template you selected and that's okay. So for now, let's just remove the disasters ones, so we don't get confused. And we're going to edit the points layer. Here we go. So let's say I wanted to highlight the county that I live in, I will pick a point and mark the county. I live in Yolo county, so let's put it there. And I'm going to title this My County. You can also add a description later. If you have data that needs additional information, you can put it here. And so, now I have my point. If I decide later on that I don't like how my point looks like, I can change a symbol, by clicking on the icon, and hitting CHANGE SYMBOL. Now here is where we get access to all the icons on the other templates. Like we saw in disasters earlier, I can add it here and say, see let's put a volcano there just for fun. And there you can see my point is now a volcano. We can also change the size if we wanted to, so let's make it really big so that it stands out. Great, so we have learned how to just add a point to our map. Now let's practice drawing an area on our map. I'm going to select the circle tool and draw a circle over the Bay Area. Let's label this Bay Area. And I'm going to change it's symbol, by making it a transparent fill with a bright orange, and thick outline. See how that looks, great. So since we are the map makers, we understand what our map means. But to a regular audience, they might not understand. So in order to give the map some more context, let's add some labels. I'm going to select the text option here, then click a point on my map. I'm typing in Bay Area. Then I'm going to click on a point away from my text box, so I can begin editing it as a feature, by clicking in it once more. Let's make the size a little bigger so we can see it, by dragging the diagonal. Next let’s change the alignment. This may be useful if you want features to snap to a certain place. You can get them to a snap to the corners or to the center. For now, I’m going to pick the center alignment and place that within my circle. Let's change the font color, so it matches the border outline. And we could apply a halo to make it pop out a little bit more. White doesn't look so good, so maybe black would look like better. Great, so now we have finished putting our label onto our area. If you decide later that you don't like your label and you want to delete it, well here's how you can do that. Once I click the label, you'll notice that I don't get that pop up like I did when I click on my volcano point, I can delete that here. However, to delete the label, all you have to do is select the text and make sure you can edit it, and then just go ahead and delete the whole thing, and that will make it disappear. I'm going to click the UNDO button, and then twice, and then REDO twice, and then my text box should pop up, because I still want that text. Great, so we just finished learning how to label our area, but you may notice that all the other labels have disappeared. Well fear not, they're actually still there. Once we get out of edit mode, by going back to the Details pane, all our county labels should still pop up. The next feature I'm going to show you is how to set a scale dependent layer. As I zoom out of the map, you'll see that it's kind of hard to read and exactly tell what my icons are looking at, especially this volcano point is way too big. So we're going to fix that, and have it show only when we zoom in close enough. So to change this, we navigate to our More Options, and set our visibility range. This black triangle currently shows what view we're looking at. In this case, it's where the states are. So we want our range to be just right above the states, so that when we zoom out, we no longer see those icons. But if we zoom in, they'll still be there. And that concludes this video. Let's review everything that we've learned. We learned how to add a map annotation layer and add points and areas to our map. We also learned how to set a visibility range and make our map notes layers scale dependant. In my next video, I will show you how to save and share your map.


Adding new text to a map

Text serves a variety of purposes on a map, and ArcMap supports three main types: labels, annotation, and graphic text. ArcMap has several tools for creating new annotation and graphic text on a map. You can enter horizontal text, text that curves, and text that has a callout or leader line. To speed the task of adding descriptive text for features, you can use the Label tool to click a feature and automatically add text to annotate it. Once you have text on your map, you can use the tools on the Draw toolbar to change its position, appearance, and text string.
This topic focuses on creating and editing map document annotation and graphic text. While you can follow these steps to create and edit geodatabase annotation, there are powerful, easy-to-use editing tools in ArcMap designed specifically for working with geodatabase annotation. If you are working with geodatabase annotation, see An overview of editing annotation for instructions on creating and editing text stored in this format.
When using the tools on the Draw toolbar to add text, unless you specify otherwise, new text will be added to the <Default> annotation group of your data frame. You can change this by setting the Active Annotation Target.
Learn about the Active Annotation Target


Adding labels vs. adding annotation or graphic text

Labels are stored differently from annotation and graphic text. ArcMap labels are placed dynamically and are the easiest way to quickly add descriptive text for many features based on feature attributes. To turn on labels, see Displaying labels.
By contrast, ArcGIS annotation and graphic text are editable and easily support adding individual pieces of text that are not associated with any map features.
Learn more about working with annotation and labels
You can create annotation for a number of features at once by converting from labels.
Learn about converting labels to annotation

To add new map document annotation or graphic text to your map, use the New Text tools on the Draw toolbar in ArcMap. These tools let you create new text:

  • At a point (text will be horizontal).
  • Along a curved line.
  • With a callout box behind the text to mask what's underneath it, and a leader line pointing from the text box to another location.

  • By clicking a feature and automatically deriving the text string from a feature attribute.
  • That automatically flows within a rectangle, circle, or irregular polygon shape.


Storage options when adding text

ArcGIS gives you several storage options for text that you need to be aware of when you add new text to your map.
If you are adding text to your map that is associated either with features or geographic spaces on your map (for example oceans or mountain ranges), you should add annotation. Within this category you can add your text as map document annotation or geodatabase annotation.
You should store your text in the map document only if you want to use the text in one particular map and only if you have relatively few pieces of text to add (less than a few hundred). You can use annotation groups to further organize map document annotation. Unless you specify otherwise, new text added with the tools on the Draw toolbar is added as map document annotation in the <Default> annotation group.
Learn more about annotation groups
You should store your text in the geodatabase if you want to use the same text in several maps or if you have more than a few hundred pieces of text to add. To add text to an annotation feature class stored in a geodatabase, use the ArcMap editing tools.
To add text around your map that stays fixed on the map page regardless of whether the map scale or extent changes, you should use graphic text. This text is sometimes referred to as layout text because you can only create it in layout view in ArcMap.
Learn more about annotation storage options:
About annotation
Annotation in the geodatabase
A comparison of annotation groups vs. geodatabase annotation.


How to add new text to a map

  1. Click the New Text tool on the Draw toolbar.
  2. Click the map display where you want the text and type the text string.
    The text will be horizontal.

  1. Click the New Splined Text tool on the Draw toolbar.
  2. Click the map display where you want to add vertices along which the text should be splined, that is, curved.
  3. Double-click to end the line.
  4. Type the text string.

  1. Click the Callout button on the Draw toolbar.
  2. Click a start point for the leader line and drag and release the mouse pointer where you want the callout and text to be placed (in the image below, the start point is the yellow dot).

  1. Click one of the Paragraph Text tools on the Draw toolbar.
    Choose either New Polygon , New Rectangle , or New Circle .
  2. Click and drag to create the graphic shape using your mouse pointer, then double-click to complete the shape.


Learn more about the map styles

Each map type offers different information and each map style is designed for a different purpose. Read about the styles and map projection used in the above map (Blank Simple Map of Uttar Pradesh, cropped outside).

Outline blank map

Outline maps, commonly known also as blank maps, indicate the overall shape of the country or region. Blank maps are often used for geography tests or other classroom or educational purposes. This blank map of Uttar Pradesh allows you to include whatever information you need to show.

These maps show international and state boundaries, country capitals and other important cities. Both labeled and unlabeled blank map with no text labels are available. Choose from a large collection of printable outline blank maps. All blank maps at Maphill are available in black & white printer-friendly format.

Cropped outside

This map shows only the area inside the borders of Uttar Pradesh. All areas outside of the borders are cropped from the image and filled with a background color.

Simple geographic map projection

A map projection is a way, how to transform points on a Earth to points on a map. The choice of projection is about selecting what kind of distortion matters less. This simple map of Uttar Pradesh uses the Plate Carree projection, also known as the geographic projection.

The Plate Carree projection is a variant of the equidistant cylindrical projection, which originates in ancient times. All meridians and parallels are straight, equally spaced, and meet at right angles. This means that each degree of latitude and longitude is of the same size over the entire world map.


Project: Building bot-ready knowledge bases (2018-2020)

A VR Communications experimental initiative to prototype a bot-ready information solution using Google’s Dialogflow.

A synergistic approach to AI information systems using structured content and chatbot technologies.

Examples of how meaningfully annotated knowledge base (KB) articles, preferably by their authors, can increase the effectiveness of the KB/bot relationship.


An information fusion approach to integrate image annotation and text mining methods for geographic knowledge discovery

Due to the steady increase in the number of heterogeneous types of location information on the internet, it is hard to organize a complete overview of the geospatial information for the tasks of knowledge acquisition related to specific geographic locations. The text- and photo-types of geographical dataset contain numerous location data, such as location-based tourism information, therefore defining high dimensional spaces of attributes that are highly correlated. In this work, we utilized text- and photo-types of location information with a novel approach of information fusion that exploits effective image annotation and location based text-mining approaches to enhance identification of geographic location and spatial cognition. In this paper, we describe our feature extraction methods to annotating images, and utilizing text mining approach to analyze images and texts simultaneously, in order to carry out geospatial text mining and image classification tasks. Subsequently, photo-images and textual documents are projected to a unified feature space, in order to generate a co-constructed semantic space for information fusion. Also, we employed text mining approaches to classify documents into various categories based upon their geospatial features, with the aims to discovering relationships between documents and geographical zones. The experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively enhance the tasks of location based knowledge discovery.

Highlights

► We developed a fusion method to integrate text and photo types of location information. ► It combines image annotation and geographic text mining. ► Photos and texts are mapped to a unified semantic space for fusion. ► The approach can associate text and image types of documents with correct geographical zones.


18.2. The macro language¶

To make your own custom plot symbol, you will need to design your own *.def files. This section defines the language used to build custom symbols. You can place these definition files in your current directory or in your

/.gmt user directory. When designing the symbol you are working in a relative coordinate system centered on (0,0). This point will be mapped to the actual location specified by your data coordinates. Furthermore, your symbol should be constructed within the domain (<-frac<1><2>,+frac<1><2>,-frac<1><2>,+frac<1><2>>) , resulting in a 1 by 1 relative canvas area. This 1 x 1 square will be scaled to your actual symbol size when plotted. However, there are no requirement that all your design fit inside this domain. This command will produce a nice template for you to draw your design:

18.2.1. Comment lines¶

Your definition file may have any number of comment lines, defined to begin with the character #. These are skipped by GMT but provides a mechanism for you to clarify what your symbol does.

18.2.2. Symbol variables¶

Simple symbols, such as circles and triangles, only take a single parameter: the symbol size, which is either given on the command line (via -Sk) or as part of the input data. However, more complicated symbols that involve angles, or conditional tests, may require more parameters. If your custom symbol requires more than the implicit single size parameter you must include the line

N: n_extra_parameters [types]

before any other macro commands. It is an optional statement in that n_extra_parameters will default to 0 unless explicitly set. By default the extra parameters are considered to be quantities that should be passed directly to the symbol machinery. However, you can use the types argument to specify different types of parameters and thus single out parameters for pre-processing. The available types are

a Geographic azimuth (positive clockwise from north toward east). Parameters identified as azimuth will first be converted to map angle (positive counter-clockwise from horizontal) given the current map projection (or simply via 90-azimuth for Cartesian plots). We ensure the angles fall in the 0-360 range and any macro test can rely on this range.

l Length, i.e., an additional length scale (in cm, inch, or point as per PROJ_LENGTH_UNIT ) in addition to the given symbol size.

o Other, i.e., a numerical quantity to be passed to the custom symbol unchanged.

r rotation angles (positive counter-clockwise from horizontal). We ensure the angles fall in the 0-360 range and any macro test can rely on this range.

s String, i.e., a single column of text to be placed by the l command. Use octal 40 to include spaces to ensure the text string remains a single word.

To use the extra parameters in your macro you address them as $1, $2, etc. There is no limit on how many parameters your symbol may use. To access the trailing text in the input file you use $t and for a particular word (number k = 0, 1, …) in the trailing text you use $tk.

18.2.3. Macro commands¶

The custom symbol language contains commands to rotate the relative coordinate system, draw free-form polygons and lines, change the current fill and/or pen, place text, and include basic geometric symbols as part of the overall design (e.g., circles, triangles, etc.). The available commands are listed in Table custsymb . Note that all angles in the arguments can be provided as variables while the remaining parameters are constants.

Append circular arc to existing path

(x_c, y_c, d, alpha_1, alpha_2)

Draw line from previous point

Rotate the coordinate system

Place an Encapsulated PostScript file

Stroke existing path only

Change current pen and fill

Plot an inverted triangle

Plot an rotated rectangle

Note for O: if an a is appended to the angle then (alpha) is considered to be a map azimuth otherwise it is a Cartesian map angle. The a modifier does not apply if the angle is given via a variable, in which case the type of angle has already been specified via N: above and already converged before seen by O. Finally, the O command can also be given the negative of a variable, e.g., -$2 to undo a rotation, if necessary.

18.2.4. Symbol fill and outline¶

Normally, symbols, polygons and lines will be rendered using any fill and outline options you have given on the command line, similarly to how the regular built-in symbols behave. For M, T, and all the lower-case symbol codes you may optionally append specific pens (with -Wpen) and fills (with -Gpen). These options will force the use of these settings and ignore any pens and fills you may or may not have specified on the command line. Passing -G- or -W- means a symbol or polygon will have no fill or outline, respectively, regardless of what your command line settings are. Unlike pen options on the command line, a pen setting inside the macro symbol offers more control. Here, pen width is a dimension and you can specify it in three different ways: (1) Give a fixed pen width with trailing unit (e.g., -W1p,red) we then apply that pen exactly as it is regardless of the size of the symbol, (2) give a normalized pen thickness in the 0-1 range (e.g., -W0.02) at run-time this thickness will be multiplied by the current symbol size to yield the actual pen thickness, and (3) specify a variable pen thickness (e.g., -W$1,blue) we then obtain the actual pen thickness from the data record at run-time. Finally, you may indicate that a symbol or polygon should be filled using the color of the current pen instead of the current fill do this by specifying -G+p. Likewise, you may indicate that an outline should be drawn with the color of the current fill instead of the current pen do this by appending +g to your -W setting (which may also indicate pen thickness and texture). E.g., -W1p,-+g would mean “draw the outline with a 1p thick dashed pen but obtain the color from the current fill”.

18.2.5. Symbol substitution¶

Custom symbols that need to plot any of the standard geometric symbols (i.e., those controlled by a single size) can make the symbol code a variable. By specifying ? instead of the symbol codes a, c, d, g, h, i, n, +, s, t, x, -, or y the actual symbol code is expected to be found at the end of each data record. Such custom symbols must be invoked with -SK rather than -Sk.

18.2.6. Text substitution¶

Normally, the l macro code will place a hard-wired text string. However, you can also obtain the entire string from your input file via a single symbol variable $t that must be declared with type s (string). The string will be taken as all trialing text in your data record. To select a single word from the trailing text you just use $tk, where k starts at 0 for the first word, regardless of how many numerical columns that precede it. For each word you plan to use you must add a type s above. Words must be separated by one tab or space only. To place the dollar sign $ itself you must use octal 44 so as to not confuse the parser with a symbol variable. The string itself, if obtained from the symbol definition file, may contain special codes that will be expanded given information from the current record. You can embed the codes %X or %Y to add the current longitude (or x) and latitude (or y) in your label string. You may also use $n (n is 1, 2, etc.) to embed a numerical symbol variable as text. It will be formatted according to FORMAT_FLOAT_MAP , unless you append the modifiers +X (format as longitude via FORMAT_GEO_MAP ), +Y (format as latitude via FORMAT_GEO_MAP ), or +T (format as calendar time via FORMAT_DATE_MAP and FORMAT_CLOCK_MAP .

18.2.7. Text alignment and font attributes¶

Like the Sl symbol in plot , you can change the current font by appending to l the modifier +ffont [ FONT_ANNOT_PRIMARY ] and change the text justification by appending the modifier +jjustify [CM]. Note: Here, the font specification will only be considered for the font type and not its size (which is set separately by your size argument) or color and outline (which are set separately by -G and -W arguments). Finally, there are two ways to specify the font size. If a fixed font size is given in points (e.g,, 12p) then the text will be set at that size regardless of the symbol size specified in -S. Without the trailing p we interpret the size as a relative size in the 0-1 range and the actual font size will then scale with the symbol size, just like other symbol items.

18.2.8. Conditional statements¶

There are two types of conditional statements in the macro language: A simple condition preceding a single command, or a more elaborate if-then-elseif-else construct. In any test you may use one (and only one) of many logical operators, as listed in Table custop .


How to manipulate annotation text outline color in ArcEngine? - Geographic Information Systems

Mapyrus is open source software and is implemented entirely in Java enabling it to run on a wide range of operating systems.

The software combines the following four features.

A Logo or turtle graphics program.

An imaginary pen is moved around a page, creating shapes that are drawn into an image file. Reusable routines are built up using a BASIC-like language. Branching and looping constructs enable complex shapes, symbols, patterns and graphs to be be defined.

SVG PDF SVG PDF SVG PDF SVG PDF SVG PDF SVG PDF SVG PDF

Reading and displaying of geographic information system (GIS) datasets, text files, or tables held in a relational database (including spatially extended databases such as Oracle Spatial, PostGIS and MySQL).

Drawing routines are applied to geographic data to produce annotated and symbolized maps and graphs. Attributes of the geographic data control the color, size, annotation and other characteristics of the appearance of the geographic data. Scalebars, legends, coordinate grids and north arrows are also available.

SVG PDF SVG PDF SVG PDF

SVG PDF SVG PDF

    As a stand-alone program for integration into scripts and batch tasks (suitable for generating a one-off map or a series of similar maps from a template showing different areas, or using different criteria for each map). A simple graphical user interface is also provided.


Watch the video: Simple annotation placement in ArcGIS Pro